walk with me

awesome
Do you ever have literary déjà vu?  No?  Of course not, because it’s my own invention, but let me explain: literary déjà vu is when something feels eerily familiar because you’ve experienced it so many times in books.
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I had an attack of the literary déjà vu attack while attending bible study at the Maplewood Nature Center with two rockin’ awesome gals.  We walked around the lake, took pictures of baby ducklings, read the Good Word, and then, just as we were heading home, I got some pretty awesome news.
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You know that moment in a book when everything suddenly comes together?  The moment I’m talking about proceeds weeks and possibly months or years of endless worrying about this, that and/or the other.
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Literary worry springs up while a main characters is running on the treadmill, writing a term paper, or boiling water — then — all of a sudden — the character wonders: Am I doing the right thing? What if this is a disastrous idea?  Will everything work out?
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Most books have a happy ending, and so the worrying usually ceases toward the end of the novel.  Life isn’t always like fiction though, so when we get one of those big breaks, it’s time for celebration, praise and lots & lots & lots of counting our blessings. And that bit about celebrating?  I took that step pretty seriously when I got home:
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Lots of awesome signs in a tiny apartment, but when it’s time to celebrate, I go big.  I also made some treats to sweeten up the occasion:
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You know who didn’t have a lucky day?  The little one below — she spent a good 20 minutes begging for some chocolate covered pretzels and didn’t get so much as a single treat.  Maybe today will be different?
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Hope everyone has an awesome weekend 🙂

sip swirl clink

wish

I love when other people share good news, and I’ve always found it puzzling that society refers to this as “bragging.” What’s wrong with talking about our joys and sharing our happiness? If you ask me, nothing. Feel free to ring me when you win the lottery or fall in love – I’m going to want the details.

You know what else?  I want to hear about your struggles and hardship, too.  People are not meant to go through life alone, and when we share stories of pain, we remind people in similar situations that they are not alone.

Professor Sonja Lyubomirsky at the University of California, Riverside, researches the nature of human happiness, particularly why some people are happier than others, and how we can train ourselves to be more happy in general. She identifies an individual’s response to social comparison as a key factor for determining their personal happiness.

Her work suggests that happy people are more likely to celebrate the success and good fortune of their friends, while unhappy people are more likely to feel jealous of their nearest and dearest.

Instead of comparing our differences, let’s celebrate them, and each of us can begin to push each other onward and upward.

And, what’s more, we’ll all be a little happier as a result : )