pulse and flow

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Whisper this, shout that, and make sure everyone hears the good news as quickly as possible.  Call it excitement, but whenever I hear something funny, touching, or honest, I’m anxious to share the announcement with my nearest and dearest. 

There is something oh-so soul-satisfying in sitting down (with coffee + macaroons) to ask: Did you know? If yes, what do you think? And, most importantly, what do we do about it?
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When Jon starts to snore and my mind is still racing, I watch TED to see musicians, chefs, entrepreneurs and other creatives talk about the issues closest to their heart.  I’ve seen hundreds of TED talks over the years, and it’s becoming increasingly rare that I’m inspired enough to wake Jon to see something I just watched.
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You can probably predict where this is going, but last night I saw Sarah Lewis speak about ‘the near win.’  Have you heard about the value of continuously coming in second, third, or even fourth place?

Sarah presents a compelling case for near-wins being more soul-satisfying than all-out victories.  When we pursue a task for the innate value of the activity, we’re more likely to appreciate process over product, ‘excitement over exterior labels,’ and learning over perfection.
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The near-win generates a mindset of flow and compulsion that drives us forward.  When we can see the finish line on the horizon, we’re more likely to sprint and push to make sure we get there.

A bit like the popular Sigmund Freud quote, “One day, in retrospect, the years of struggle will strike you as the most beautiful.”